Home // Articles posted by Cheryl Gladu (Page 2)

Real-time archaeology: Visualizing urban waste.

In the paper “Jetsam: Exposing our Everyday Discarded Objects,” authors Eric Paulos and Tom Jenkins propose an “urban probe” as a tool to solicit thought, wonderment, and contemplation. The project aims to solicit a conversation around the use of technology in urban environments and how this might influence our behaviour in cities. The project include an “augmented trashcan”

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Be moved by design – right up the stairs!

In the 2005 paper “Using the Environment as an Interactive Interface to Motivate Positive Behavior Change in a Subway Station,” Anijo Punnen Mathew proposes a series of changes to a subway station, with the aim to use the environment as an incremental persuasion tool towards more pro-social behavior, such as taking the stairs rather than the escalator. While

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The flavour of the month: Paper-saving.

In the paper “Curbing Paper Wastage Using Flavoured Feedback,” researcher Richard Medland introduces an experiment in a certain tailoring of feedback with the goal of reducing paper wastage in a university setting. The main objective of the project is to better understand the motivation of staff in terms of more sustainable printing practices, and in this vein

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Coralog: A plea to idle no more.

In the paper “Coralog: Use-Aware Visualization Connecting Human Micro-Activities to Environmental Change,” the authors Tanyoung Kim, Hwajung Hong, and Brian Magerko introduce us to, well, Coralog, a computer widget that draws a parallel between computer idle time and the health of coral reefs. In the paper “Designing for Persuasion:Toward Ambient Eco-Visualization for Awareness,” the same

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Visualization in advertisement: Blunt black balloons.

As little lesson on effective communication via advertisement. While we know that information alone is not enough to change the behavior of most people, this Victorian Government campaign created by George Patterson Y&R Melbourne is an excellent visualization, which helps to describe the issue of carbon emissions related to habitual energy use. 1 black balloon

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The invisible hand of ambient eco-feedback.

In the paper, “Can Ambient Persuasive Technology Persuade Unconsciously? Using Subliminal Feedback to Influence Energy Consumption Ratings of Household Appliances” by Jaap Ham, Cees Midden, and Femke Beute we are presented with the possibility that ecofeedback tools might not only willingly guide you towards better environmental stewardship, but that they may be able to reach

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SINAIS from Fanal: For a more artistic approach to ecofeedback

In the paper “SINAIS from Fanal: design and evaluation of an art-inspired eco-feedback system,” authors Valentina Nisi, Nuno Jardim Nunes, Filipe Quintal, and Mary Barreto present SINAIS from Fanal, an ecofeedback tool guided by artistic sensibilities. The main project was build around SINAIS sensor system, a low-cost netbook that performs all the tasks associated with

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Shower calendar: A thousand points of comparative water consumption.

In the article ” With a Little Help from a Friend: A Shower Calendar to Save Water,” by Matthias Laschke, Marc Hassenzahl, Sarah Diefenbach, and Marius Tippkämperwe, we are introduced to an ambient visualization tool which allows users of a shower to compare relative water savings within a household. The authors suggest that ambient feedback is “non judgmental” in that it does

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O rly? A smiley face makes an impact with OPower.

“If something is inconvenient, even if we believe in it, moral suasion, financial incentives, don’t do much to move us — but social pressure, that’s powerful stuff.” – Alex Laskey For years Robert Cialdini, author of the must-read social psychology book Influence, has been studying the impact of social norms on behavior change and pro-environmental

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The Element: Shedding a light on energy consumption

In the paper “Visualizing Energy Consumption of Radiators,” authors Magnus Gyllensward, Anton Gustafsson, and Magnus Bang consider how to make the energy used in heating a home visible. They developed a radiator made entirely of light bulbs, which responds to temperature changes in a room using sensors. The main aim of the research was to

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